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Annual Conference 2018 - Cardiff

Welcome to the 2018 ABO Conference.

Below you will find the timetable of sessions for each day. Click on the day to see an overview of times and sessions, then click through to the time slots to see session descriptions and speakers.

N.B. The full conference place includes the Conference Dinner but not a ticket to the Conference Concert on Wednesday 24 January in Hoddinott Hall. This item must be purchased separately under 'individual items'.  All prices below exclude VAT. 

Translation
Welsh translation can be provided to delegates during the conference sessions if practicable. If you would like us to provide translation, please indicate this in the special requirements box below and complete the spreadsheet to indicate which sessions you would like translation to be provided and for how many delegates by Wednesday 13 December. Download the spreadsheet here.

 

Wednesday 24 January

Registration and the official opening sessions of the ABO Conference 2018 take place at the Wales Millennium Centre.

12:30 REGISTRATION AND SANDWICH LUNCH, (INCLUDING FIRST TIME DELEGATES)

14:00 OFFICIAL OPENING

15:15 NETWORKING BREAK (SPONSORED BY BACH)

15:45 THE BIG DEBATE: INTERNATIONAL COLLABORATION

18:15 PRE-CONCERT RECEPTION (The Senedd)

19:30 CONFERENCE CONCERT 

21:30 POST-CONCERT SUPPER

OFFICIAL OPENING

Welcome to delegates from the new Chair of the ABO, our Welsh hosts, Nick Capaldi of Arts Council of Wales and Sam Jackson, Managing Editor, Classic FM.

Opening Address by Kevin Brennan MP, Shadow Culture Minister
Keynote Speaker: Sir Ciaran Devane, Chief Executive, British Council

THE BIG DEBATE: INTERNATIONAL COLLABORATION

As Brexit looms, and our government talks up the prospects for new trade deals and emerging markets, how do we sustain the collaborations we have achieved with colleagues in Europe over many decades, while also forging new collaborations in new places?  Chaired by Phil George, Chair, Arts Council of Wales and featuring Sir Ciaran Devane, Chief Executive, British Council; Eluned Haf, Head of Wales Arts International; and Julie Ward MEP.

Conference Concert

BBC HODDINOTT HALL, WALES MILLENNIUM CENTRE

R. STRAUSS         Rosenkavalier Suite,Welsh National Opera Orchestra

RIMSKY-KORSAKOV  Scheherazade,BBC National Orchestra of Wales

Conductors

Tomáš Hanus       Music Director, Welsh National Opera

Thomas Søndergård  Principal Conductor, BBC National Orchestra of Wales

 

* There is an additional cost for this item (£15.00).
 

Thursday 25 January

09:00 REGISTRATION OPENS (WMC)

10:00 DIVERSITY IN ACTION: I'M BIASED
10:00 INTERNATIONAL COLLABORATION: CREATIVE EUROPE
10:00 COLLABORATION: CONSORTIUM WORKING
10:00 THE COLLABORATIVE MUSICIAN: HEALTH AND WELL-BEING

11:15 NETWORKING BREAK

11:45 COLLABORATIVE LEARNING: Effective partnership working - getting beyond the rhetoric
11:45 THE CLASSIC FM SESSION: COLLABORATIVE RECORDINGS
11:45 INTERNATIONALCOLLABORATION: THE GULF STATES
11:45 DIVERSITY IN ACTION: I'M IN

13:00 LUNCH

14:00 THE COLLABORATIVE MUSICIAN or DON'T YOU TRUST ME?
14:00 DIVERSITY IN ACTION: Inspiring change in our leadership approach to disability
14.00 THE COLLABORATIVE AUDIENCE

15:30 NETWORKING BREAK

16:00 SINFONIA CYMRU CONCERT

17.00 KEYNOTE SPEECH: HORACE TRUBRIDGE, MUSICIANS UNION

19:00 PRE-DINNER RECEPTION, THE EXCHANGE HOTEL

20:00 CONFERENCE DINNER, THE EXCHANGE HOTEL (including ABO Award and Rhinegold Awards presentation)

DIVERSITY IN ACTION: I'M BIASED

Following the diversity strand at the 2017 conference we kick off a series of sessions looking at progress on this crucial issue one year on. Through roundtable discussions and facilitated practical exercises, we will begin to explore the concept of unconscious bias, its influence on the decisions we make, and the outcomes we see in the industry as a result. Much has happened in the 12 months since London Music Masters’ 2017 conference session ‘Diversity – the musician’ and we look forward to sharing stories from across the sector with this year’s delegates. With Rob Adediran, London Music Masters and Aesha Zafar, HR, Learning & Development, Projects & Change, BBC.

INTERNATIONAL COLLABORATION: CREATIVE EUROPE

Following our opening debate on international collaboration, we look at the role played by the Creative Europe programme in forging partnerships across Europe, and what makes for a genuine and successful collaboration where the impact and success goes well beyond the funding aspect. With Christoph Jankowski, Head of Culture, Creative Europe Desk UK and featuring several innovative case studies and experienced project managers.

COLLABORATION: CONSORTIUM WORKING

What value does working as a consortium bring to creating new audiences for orchestral music? We look at two recent case studies, one urban, one rural, that illustrate the power of partnership. Classically Yours has developed a ground-breaking, collaborative approach to audience development in a rural, culturally underserved area. Orchestras Live and partners, including the East Riding of Yorkshire Council, Sinfonia Viva and Manchester Camerata, will share their experience of this new way of working. South East Wales Orchestral Consortium brought together a range orchestral partners in Cardiff and the surrounding region, and has been through the classic phases of ‘group development’ whilst keeping the ultimate goal of serving the audience always front of mind. Come and hear about how a range of different and independent organisations can throw off history and previous attitudes, to work together to deliver audience growth and a sense of civic pride. Chaired by Michael Garvey, BBC National Orchestra of Wales, with Laura Drane, consultant to the Cardiff Consortium and Sarah Derbyshire,Orchestras Live.

THE COLLABORATIVE MUSICIAN: HEALTH AND WELL-BEING

Key to a collaborative relationship between managers and musicians is providing a healthy working environment. We’ll take a look at two recent initiatives, one focusing on what we can learn from sports psychology to help performing musicians tackle performance anxiety and integrate psychological strategies to optimise their music performance, and the other embedding a Performance and Wellbeing programme for musicians focusing on performance enhancement, physical and emotional health and wellbeing. Chaired by Simon Webb, BBC Philharmonic Orchestra, with Deborah Annetts, Incorporated Society of Musicians, Peter Garden, Royal Liverpool Philharmonic and Joe Hastings, Help Musicians UK.

COLLABORATIVE LEARNING: Effective partnership working - getting beyond the rhetoric

Partnership is a much used term in music and music education but what does an effective partnership really look like in high quality, orchestral education practice? What are the vital ingredients to make it successful and what are the pitfalls to watch out for? Hear from leaders in the field about their approach to partnership working and current best practice. Following the panel discussion, delegates will work in table groups to discuss their own partnership working and how this can be developed in the future and then feedback. Chaired by Matt Griffiths,Youth Music.

THE CLASSIC FM SESSION: COLLABORATIVE RECORDINGS

As the record industry adapts to the disruptive forces on its business model, new approaches to classical music recordings are becoming the norm. What future collaborations will we need to ensure we maintain a presence in the recorded marketplace? Chaired by Sam Jackson of Classic FM, and featuring Rebecca Allen, President, Decca Records Group UK.

INTERNATIONAL COLLABORATION: THE GULF STATES

One of the emerging markets the UK Government is keen for orchestras to engage with is the Gulf States. What have we learnt from recent visits, what is the potential for growth, what more can we offer promoters, and how can we build sustained relationships? Chaired by Cathy Graham, Director of Music, British Council with Emma Flatley, Welsh National Opera, Jonathan Harper, British ParaOrchestra, Jasper Hope, Dubai Opera and Paul Hughes, BBC Symphony Orchestra.

DIVERSITY IN ACTION: I'M IN

Building on the earlier “I’m Biased” session, delegates will analyse a new approach to addressing the lack of diversity in the classical music industry: a tool developed by London Music Masters, with a wide range of industry leaders, which uncovers the bias within our organisational structures. The tool is built on the premise that unconscious bias is a contributing factor to the lack of diversity in our industry, and that uncovering its effects in our day-to-day work is the first step to countering its impact. In this session delegates will have the opportunity to explore and critique this new approach. With Rob Adediran, London Music Masters, Irfaan Arif, National Centre for Diversity and Aesha Zafar, HR, Learning & Development, Projects & Change, BBC.

THE COLLABORATIVE MUSICIAN or DON'T YOU TRUST ME?

Collaboration within orchestras, between musicians and managers, should, you might think, be straight forward. However, with well defined and arguably narrow roles and job descriptions it is not easy to achieve. It requires trust. Trust is essential in any relationship and not an instant phenomenon. It is earned over a period of time. That time can be shortened and trust strengthened by the application of some simple actions and habits. This interactive session will have you practice some of these with potentially complete strangers. Warning – shy people should think twice before attending! Led by Cath Arlidge MBE, artistic director, National Children’s Orchestras of Great Britain and violinist, CBSO, and John Kieser, Executive Vice President and Provost, New World Symphony.

DIVERSITY IN ACTION: Inspiring change in our leadership approach to disability

UK funding agency statistics suggest that very few disabled people are employed by us, play for us or sit on our boards, yet they make up a significant element of our audiences. How do we harness the experience, knowledge and talent of disabled people to make our orchestras and opera companies better and stronger? Our panel will offer insight drawn from the award winning Ramps on The Moon theatre initiative, Arts Council England’s Changemaker programme and one of the newest ABO members, British ParaOrchestra. Chaired by Andrew Miller, Executive Associate, Royal & Derngate with Lloyd Coleman, Associate Music Director, British Paraorchestra & Friends; Sarah Holmes, Chief Executive, New Wolsey Theatre, Ipswich; Abid Hussein, Director of Diversity, Arts Council England; and Michèle Taylor, Director for Change, Ramps on the Moon.

THE COLLABORATIVE AUDIENCE

In an era where people want to be creators and collaborators as well as just consumers, it's more important than ever that we engage with our audiences, current and potential. In this session, led by William Norris of the Tafelmusik Baroque Orchestra, we'll explore why it's important to engage with audiences and look at real-life examples of audience collaboration in action, from across the orchestral sector and beyond. With Suzanne Hay, BBC National Orchestra of Wales.

SINFONIA CYMRU CONCERT

Birdsong / Cân Yr Adar

Inspired by the Welsh rainforest at Carngafallt, Birdsong/Cân Yr Adar is a collaboration between jazz pianist and composer Gwilym Simcock, Welsh/Bajan singer songwriter Kizzy Crawford, Sinfonia Cymru and RSPB Cymru. Enjoy a journey through the seasons of the forest in a bilingual piece which fuses jazz, soul-folk and classical music.

KEYNOTE SPEECH: HORACE TRUBRIDGE

Horace Trubridge, recently elected General Secretary of the Musicians’ Union will give us his perspective on collaboration between managers and musicians.

   

Conference Dinner

The conference dinner will be held at The Exchange Hotel and will include the presentation of the 2018 ABO Award and the ABO/Rhinegold Awards by Anne-Marie Minhall, presenter on Classic FM.

* Unless booking as part of the full conference there is an additional cost for this item (£55.00).
 

Friday 26 January

09:00 REGISTRATION OPENS (WMC)

10:00 COLLABORATIVE COMMISSIONING
10:00 THE BBC SESSIONS: THE COLLABORATIVE RADIO ORCHESTRA

10:00 DIVERSITY IN ACTION: ONE YEAR ON
10:00 COLLABORATION: FIND YOUR WAY

11:15 NETWORKING BREAK

11:45 THE ART OF COLLABORATION
11:45 THE BBC SESSIONS: THE COLLABORATIVE BROADCASTER
11:45 THE COLLABORATIVE ORCHESTRA: CHORUSES
11:45 YOUTH ENSEMBLES: COLLABORATING FOR LONG TERM SUSTAINABILITY

13:00 LUNCH

14:00 CLOSING SESSION (HODDINOTT HALL)

15.30 CONFERENCE ENDS

COLLABORATIVE COMMISSIONING

Putting communities at the heart of the creative process is a great way of shifting our audiences from consumers to collaborators. We look at two recent projects across music and theatre, Live Music Now’s Songs from Above and Below and National Theatre of Wales’s We’re Still Here, which worked with people from mining and steelworking communities, and explore the benefits for performers and participants alike. With Carol Main and musicians Jennifer Walker and Rhiannon Pritchard of Live Music Now Scotland, and Kully Thiarai, National Theatre of Wales and Rhiannon White, Director, We're Still Here.

THE BBC SESSIONS:THE COLLABORATIVE RADIO ORCHESTRA

It is all too easy for our industry to see ourselves as competitors rather than collaborators. It’s time to take stock of the landscape today, the value that radio orchestras bring to the orchestral and broadcast ecology, what ‘distinctiveness’ really means, and what role collaboration will play in their future relationship with colleagues in the independent sector. Chaired by BBC Radio 3 presenter Katie Derham, with Alan Davey, Controller, BBC Radio 3, Geza Kovacs, Hungarian Radio Symphonic Orchestra, and Helen Sprott, Philharmonia Orchestra.

DIVERSITY IN ACTION: ONE YEAR ON

Continuing our in-depth look at progress made on the diversity agenda, we look at steps taken to achieve change on ethnicity and gender. Following our Learning from the USA session at last year’s conference, we hear from Walter Bitner of Nashville Symphony Orchestra, who will talk delegates through their Accelerando programme, designed to prepare gifted young students of diverse ethnic backgrounds to pursue music at collegiate level and beyond. Meanwhile the provocation on gender inequality given by James Murphy of Southbank Sinfonia at last year’s conference was reported in The Guardian and has amassed 4000 views and counting on YouTube. James returns to gauge what progress – if any – has been made, and to present fresh statistics and news of what others sector-wide are doing to address the issue, and Lydia Connolly of HarrisonParrott will share details of a significant new initiative set to celebrate and empower talented female conductors.

COLLABORATION: FIND YOUR WAY

This year’s Find Your Way participants, supported by funding from Arts Council England and the Jerwood Foundation, will curate a session looking at the role that the next generation of leaders can play in building the collaborative orchestra.

THE ART OF COLLABORATION

What value does collaborating with other artforms bring to our sector? Featuring the Royal Welsh College of Music and Dance’s participation in the James Richards/Chapter exhibition installation at Wales In Venice/Cymru Yn Fenis and Scottish Ensemble’s collaboration with Andersson Dance, Goldberg Variations – ternary patterns for insomnia, we look at the benefits that collaboration brings to all involved. With John Hardy, Samuel Williams and Kirsten Evans of Royal Welsh College of Music and Drama, Hannah Firth, Director of Visual Art & Programme, Chapter and Fraser Anderson, Jonathan Morton and Jo Green of Scottish Ensemble.

THE BBC SESSIONS: THE COLLABORATIVE BROADCASTER

As classical music fights to assert itself in an ever more crowded market for entertainment, what role can our national broadcaster play, across its many platforms, to reach new audiences and argue the case for our cultural value? Chaired by Rebecca Jones, BBC Arts Correspondent, with Owen Hopkin, Head of Audience Development and Distribution, The Space, Kim McNally-Luke, Senior Research Manager, BBC Music and Jan Younghusband, Commissioning Editor, BBC Music & Events.

THE COLLABORATIVE ORCHESTRA: CHORUSES

With recent research suggesting that well over 2 million people in the UK sing in a choir, how are orchestras collaborating with this resurgence in choral singing? What of the relationship between symphony chorus and orchestra, choral directors and conductors, and chorus members and orchestral musicians? Do we value and nurture these choirs, and the outstanding but unpaid service they provide? How can orchestras best engage and benefit singers of all and any musical backgrounds? Chaired by Matthew Swann, City of London Sinfonia, with Leslie East, Association of British Choral Directors, Neil Ferris, BBC Symphony Chorus and Lucy Galliard, City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra.

YOUTH ENSEMBLES: COLLABORATING FOR LONG TERM SUSTAINABILITY

This session will follow hot on the heels of the Music Mark 2017 Conference at which delegates will have discussed how to broaden access to youth ensembles. A summary of the discussions and an initial provocation by David Taylor, Yorkshire Young Sinfonia will be followed by a discussion facilitated by Bridget Whyte, Chief Executive, Music Mark. We aim to gain a consensus on the question ‘how can we ensure the long term sustainability of Youth Orchestras/Ensembles at a local/county level’?

OFFICIAL CLOSING

As we move the conference into the BBC’s magnificent Hoddinott Hall, we hear from their Director-General Lord Hall on the BBC’s plans for classical music. We then look ahead to the ABO’s 70th anniversary in March 2018 and invite delegates to the 2019 Conference in Belfast, hosted by the Ulster Orchestra.

 
 

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